Category: Literacy

Content Area Literacy Strategies That Work

Jordan Walker-Reyes recommends Lori Wilfong’s Content Area Literacy Strategies That Work to all literacy coaches and facilitators, ESL teachers, and content area teachers who want to grow students’ content area knowledge while also increasing their literacy skills.

A Year of Literacy Lessons for Grades 3-5

Literacy Strong All Year Long: Powerful Lessons for Grades 3-5 is crammed with so many literacy ideas and resources that you will want to try each one, writes teacher educator Linda Biondi. She predicts that it will be a “go to” book for the rest of your teaching life.

Literacy and Learning Centers for the Big Kids

Thanks to Literacy and Learning Centers for the Big Kids, secondary teachers across the content areas won’t need to tweak elementary guides and hope things work with older kids. Instructional coach Janice Rustico finds the start-to-finish help just what her teachers need.

A Comprehensive Look at Responsive Literacy

Responsive Literacy’s 400 pages are well worth the read, writes Linda Biondi. Each of the contributing teacher educators present a theoretical framework and practical tools to apply in the classroom and guidance on how to help young students develop a love of literacy. Five stars.

Quick Reference Guide to Literacy Teaching

The Literacy Quick Guide by popular experts Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell is a good planning resource for the busy teacher who does not have much time to read lengthy explanations and theory. Teacher Stacy Thorpe provides a detailed overview of the PreK-8 resource.

Adding Digital Strategies to Literacy Coaching

Reading Stephanie Affinito’s Literacy Coaching can benefit classroom teachers as well as literacy coaches, writes educator Kathleen Palmieri. In addition to covering learning communities, PD, and collaboration, the book offers extensive digital resources to boost student learning.

Literacy Activities That Students Do (Not You!)

Nancy Akhavan encourages teachers to push away from assigned passages with worksheets that require canned responses, and instead promote more freedom in student thinking, and more reflection about their connection to the reading and writing going on in their classroom.

“It’s Like Having Coffee with a Master Teacher”

Leafing through Regie Routman’s Literacy Essentials feels not so much like reading a book as like talking with a master teacher, or maybe wading in and out of a calm ocean, writes teacher Sarah Cooper, who finds it a compendium of wisdom about teaching and about life.