Category: Book Reviews

Professional books reviewed by educators

The Power We Gain by Teaching Vulnerably

In The Power of Teaching Vulnerably David Rockower explains how personal, relational, and dialogic vulnerability can help educators build healthy classroom dialogue. Amy Estersohn would have liked more guidance for teachers facing job loss if they discuss sensitive topics.

Helping Students Avoid the Perils of Plagiarism

Barry Gilmore’s Plagiarism: A How-Not-To Guide for Students helps learners understand the motivation behind plagiarism and discusses ways to avoid it in both academic and employment settings. Eighth grade teacher Erin Corrigan-Smith also recommends the teacher’s edition.

9 Mindsets for Helping Kids on the Spectrum

Grandin & Moore’s Navigating Autism invites readers into that perfect space for learning between familiar territory and new information, writes middle school dean Bill Ivey. The nine mindsets explored can benefit kids on the spectrum as well as the whole spectrum of kids.

Literacy Conferences to Reach All Students

Literacy consultant Anne Anderson recommends fellow literacy teachers and coaches keep Dan Feigelson’s Radical Listening near at hand. Implementing the book’s detailed guidelines for active listening during reading and writing conferences will benefit all of your learners.

The Educator’s Guide to Time Management

The first step to taking control of your time is making the effort, and educator Frank Buck’s “Get Organized Digitally!” provides the rungs of the ladder to get you there. Department chair Stephanie Choate says Buck inserts educator success stories in just the right places. Highly recommended.

Designing Successful Independent Study

Geraldine Woods offers strategies for teachers to design and implement a self-contained independent study program or to incorporate principles of independent study into an existing unit or class. Sarah Cooper finds the book’s efficacy lies in its wide, practical application.