Category: Articles

Guest posts by expert educators

Communicate Effectively with Your School Board

Communication is central to an educator’s role as an advocate. Of particular importance, say the co-authors of Advocacy From A-Z, is the ability of school and teacher leaders to communicate with the school board to advocate for an issue. These nine principles can help.

Fair Isn’t Always Equal – 3 Grading Malpractices

If we expect students to achieve mastery, teaching consultant Rick Wormeli says, we must provide helpful feedback, document progress, and inform our instructional decisions with pertinent performance data. Yet many conventional grading practices render our data useless.

8 Essay-Free Ways to Share Student Research

Research-based essays help our students fluently build, develop, and expand on their ideas. But in the real world, not every research process ends in a full-blown essay, says Angie Miller, who shares eight fun ways for students to practice and incorporate research skills.

STEM Fiction Can Help Energize ELA Classes

More emphasis on STEM studies has more language arts teachers working to integrate compatible nonfiction. But what about fiction? Megan Kelly shows how novels with STEM themes let students make an emotional connection to characters while learning scientific concepts.

All the Vocabulary Help You’re Likely to Need

Under the canopy of the Common Core, student knowledge of academic vocabulary matters more than ever, across all the content areas. As assessment season approaches, MiddleWeb has gathered together our five most popular and helpful articles about word study.

Young Adult Literature with LGBTQAI+ Themes

Among the ways educators can support and promote acceptance of LGBTQAI+ youth is by providing access to literature that features the challenges and joys these students experience. Librarian and author Christina Dorr suggests fiction and nonfiction titles for YA readers.

Teacher Think Alouds Work in Every Subject

Teacher think alouds are great for grades 4-8, says author Molly Ness. “The goal is to provide less savvy readers with a play-by-play of what you – as a skilled reader – think while reading.” The secret is planning. They may sound spontaneous but must be choreographed.