Tagged: climate change

Teaching Students That Poetry Is a Necessity

Dina Strasser finds more poets are writing about climate change and other social justice issues. Such poems can provide alternatives to middle schoolers when themes aren’t too entangled in complex structures. She suggests some options students can “hook into easily.”

We Need to Speak Up About Climate Change

We can no longer avoid teaching about climate change because it’s not in our content area or curriculum guide, writes teacher leader Dina Strasser. Educators can’t shield children from “eco-anxiety,” but they can give them hope and the knowledge and skills to take action.

Climate Change Studies: “What Have You Heard?”

If you are searching for a comprehensive way to explore the complexities of climate change, address student (and popular) misconceptions and involve students in the search for solutions, you’ll want “Understanding Climate Change,” says science teacher Virginia Brackett.

Teaching Climate Change in the Middle Grades

Facilitating science-based research around real world problems empowers students through the skills they acquire and the subject knowledge they gain, says teacher Angela Duke. And what better topic than climate change? “The environment of the future will be theirs to live in.”

Teach Climate Change Through Positive Action

Middle school science educator and Albert Einstein Distinguished Education Fellow Joshua Sneideman and energy education specialist Erin Twamley share seven ways that teachers and schools can involve students in climate change studies. Included: Project ideas.

Why I Marched for Science on Earth Day

In science educator Anne Jolly’s mind, protests on behalf of science-based policy making are not about partisanship but about protecting jobs and the economy, our children’s health and prosperity, and ultimately our planet. That’s why she joined the March for Science.

Climate Ed Projects to Engage Tweens

Climate Change: Discover How it Impacts Spaceship Earth with 25 Projects is on a level that most tweens can grasp, yet it is not oversimplified and builds vocabulary. With its cool facts and high order questions, this book gets MS teacher Laura Von Staden’s recommendation.