Tagged: fiction

How We Get Kids to Read Hard Nonfiction

Learning to read hard nonfiction is a life skill, says principal Rita Platt. It allows students to dive deep into content, enriches vocabulary, and can be a jumping-off point for developing lifelong pursuits. Platt shares strategies her school uses to spark interest.

Fiction: “Adequate Yearly Progress” Is a Hoot

Reading NBCT Roxanna Elden’s novel chronicling the trials and tribulations of educators at fictional Brae Hill Valley HS made Rita Platt laugh. A lot. While Elden reveals the often “dark heart” of reform, she also captures the small everyday successes that keep us going.

Using Mood and Imagery to Engage Kids with Text

Whether they are fiction or nonfiction, the best stories are told through mood as we react to events, people and emotions. For students, identifying, tracking and exploring moods in stories and images is an easy way to enter into text. Teacher Trevor Bryan shares his approach.

Pair Just-right Texts and Reading Strategies

Every teacher who works with students as readers should read Jennifer Serravallo’s new book, Understanding Texts & Readers, writes NCBT and principal Rita Platt, noting it brings big-picture reading goals, skills, strategies and texts together in a meaningful hierarchy.

Building Comprehension Using Leveled Texts

Jennifer Serravallo’s new book will help teachers become more cognizant of their students’ literacy needs and better prepared to meet those needs effectively. Reviewer and preservice coach Linda Biondi praises Serravallo’s student-centered approach to book leveling.

Young Adult Literature with LGBTQAI+ Themes

Among the ways educators can support and promote acceptance of LGBTQAI+ youth is by providing access to literature that features the challenges and joys these students experience. Librarian and author Christina Dorr suggests fiction and nonfiction titles for YA readers.

Differentiated Fiction and Nonfiction Lessons

This resource-rich book of comprehensive lessons is great for teachers who want to challenge 4th and 5th graders or for middle school educators looking for a way to bridge the gap from where students are to where they need to be, says ELA teacher Erin Corrigan-Smith.