Author: MiddleWeb

Leadership through Connected Relationships

In Unconventional Leadership, Minnesota principal Jessica M. Cabeen offers principals extensive resources to move beyond the office and become more connected, collaborative, and creative leaders, writes social studies teacher and school PD director Becky Johnson.

Help Students Make the Most of Interviews

Similar to reading, listening to what we hear during an interview requires comprehension and the active construction of meaning. Elizabeth Hagan, Lisa Friesen and Sunday Cummins share action research on ways to prepare students to conduct interviews they’ll enjoy and learn from.

Helping Our Students Think About Thinking

Reflecting on their work gives students an opportunity to look back at what they have done, examine the processes and strategies they used, and think about the importance of their effort and growth. Literacy coach Lynne Dorfman explores ways to cultivate metacognition.

Cris Tovani: Use These 6Ts to Deepen Learning

Teacher, author and adolescent literacy consultant Cris Tovani guides us through her 6Ts (Topic, Target, Task, Text, Time, and Tending) as she tells the story of her first virtual literacy workshop – with 7th graders who are studying the Sahara Desert. Engagement? CYA!

Empower Students with Metacognition Skills

In Metacognition: The Neglected Skill Set, Robin Fogarty and Brian Pete offer 30 grab-and-go strategies to help students create a new habit of mind, writes middle school director Jeny Randall. Along with tools for teaching, they invite us to hone our own metacognitive skills.

Nurturing Truth-Seeking Communities in School

Over the life of our nation, history has been recorded from a singularly white perspective. Pablo Wolfe, Mary Ehrenworth and Marc Todd suggest ways we can create truth-seeking communities in our schools and “inoculate our students against the viral spread of falsehood.”

How to Help Students Think for Themselves

A Teacher’s Guide to Philosophy for Children is a short, comprehensive approach to teaching students the process of thinking for themselves. Instead of being the giver of knowledge, teachers can focus on helping students find answers worth knowing, writes Erin Corrigan-Smith.