Author: MiddleWeb

Make This Your Summer to Reflect and Envision!

The best tool in your classroom is YOU, the teacher. You’re the listener, questioner, connector. With summer at hand, math teacher Mona Iehl shares ways to prep yourself for next year. Relax, yes. Then reflect on what you’ve learned and envision a few manageable new approaches.

4 Ways to Reclaim Our Optimism for Our Schools

As we close the 2022-23 school year many educators are asking, “How do we reset the positivity and passion we once had in our profession?” It’s a good question, writes educator and speaker Dr. Debbie Silver, author of Deliberate Optimism. She shares four rallying principles.

Writing Conferences: A Minimalist Approach

Author and literacy consultant Patty McGee offers a minimalist alternative to heavy correction that provides an engaging, motivating, and meaningful approach to writing conferences. Try McGee’s three moves: choose a focus, name a writer’s strength, and suggest a next step.

SEL Reading & Reflection for Gifted Students

Author Thomas Hébert recommends K-12 books he believes can help gifted students develop SEL skills. Vignettes from six classrooms demonstrate ways to use text selections effectively. Reviewer Amy Estersohn found the book’s appendix of 160+ suggested texts most valuable.

5 Ways to Be Sure That Lessons Stick in Memory

What makes our lessons memorable? Looking into semantic, episodic, emotional, procedural and automatic memory, teaching consultant Marilee Sprenger shares ways to engage students’ long-term storage systems so that memories take hold. Start with visuals and play based learning!

Use Mentor Texts to Multitask: Less Is More!

Mentor Texts That Multitask by Pam Koutrakos is a perfect ELA resource for working smarter, not harder. It leads readers through the why, what and how of using mentor texts to design flexible, integrated, multifaceted literacy learning – and includes free online resources.

Help Kids Take Charge of Their Emotions

When our students are struggling with anxiety, they need support in developing strategies to help break down their problems. Chunking a problem and examining possible options can help make it feel more manageable. School psychologist Katelyn Oellerich shares some examples.

Learning to Teach with AI a Small Bite at a Time

If you are an educator trying to explore what AI can do without becoming overwhelmed, edtech expert Shawn McCusker recommends you start small. Jot down some questions or topics to explore. These might include academic integrity, lesson design, or how AI can save precious time.