Tagged: empathy

Let Students Read! Why Quantity Really Counts

If we want our students to be readers, we have to let them read, writes principal and reading teacher Rita Platt. We have to give them time for the kind of reading that is guided by curiosity, joy, and love of story. Platt shows exactly how her school made this work.

Design Thinking for School Leaders

After explaining design thinking, Alyssa Gallagher and Kami Thordarson detail the roles and mindsets school leaders need to adapt as they move beyond traditional thought processes and ignite positive change. Educator Brian Taylor recommends the book’s strategies.

Teaching Current Events in the History Classroom

Sarah Cooper’s Creating Citizens is brimming with insight on how to connect current events to history, writes social studies teacher Joanne Bell. Cooper offers fresh ideas, higher order skills, and excellent implementation tips, all applicable to any period of history.

Social Comprehension Helps Us Be the Change

Being the Change is a book about enhancing professional knowledge, but it’s also one with heart, inspiring educators to think about ways their teaching can impact the future of our world so it’s a more compassionate place. Practical and insightful, writes Lisa Maucione.

10 Ways to Build the Trust Kids Need to Learn

It’s difficult to learn from someone we don’t trust, writes literacy consultant Regie Routman. Bonding with individual students and their families builds that trust. Routman offers 10 ways to make sure that none of our students ever become “mostly silent and unseen.”

Kids Speak Out on Student Engagement

You might look at Heather Wolpert-Gawron’s table of contents in “Just Ask Us” and think that you’ve seen these topics before. You have – but you likely haven’t seen them all in one place, enhanced by the rich voices and wisdom of our students. says teacher Sarah Cooper.

Put Yourself in the Shoes of a Middle Grades Writer

Middle graders are unique, often unpredictable writers who are thirsty to refine their own personal voice. To help them succeed, literacy consultant Patty McGee recommends offering adolescent writers individual feedback that is present, empathetic, and choice-filled.