Tagged: Erin Corrigan-Smith

How to Help Students Think for Themselves

A Teacher’s Guide to Philosophy for Children is a short, comprehensive approach to teaching students the process of thinking for themselves. Instead of being the giver of knowledge, teachers can focus on helping students find answers worth knowing, writes Erin Corrigan-Smith.

Bringing Drama Alive: Lessons and Scripts

The Drama Book a great resource for introducing drama into the ELA classroom, especially for inexperienced teachers who are unsure how to best tackle it. It offers practical teaching advice and amazing lesson plans, writes middle school teacher Erin Corrigan-Smith.

What It Means to Have Rigor in RTI Classrooms

Rigor in the RTI and MTSS Classroom is a practical, research-based approach to the “what” and “how” involved in helping struggling students succeed. Erin Corrigan-Smith notes the authors’ assurance that educators have the knowledge and power to make change happen.

Helping Middle Graders Master Nonfiction Texts

With this volume of their Jacob’s Ladder program Joyce VanTassel-Baskel and Tamra Stambaugh have devised a way to garner the most impact from nonfiction mini-lessons while allowing for flexibility and choice within the texts, says educator Erin Corrigan-Smith.

Reciprocal Teaching for Improving Reading

Implement the elements of reciprocal teaching – predicting, questioning, clarifying, and summarizing – using Lori Oczkus’s revised book on reading comprehension. ELA teacher Erin Corrigan-Smith likes the guidance in starting the scaffolded discussion method and more.

Reading Comprehension One Step at a Time

Stambaugh and VanTassel-Baska focus on purposeful planning, finding stories to engage young readers, and discovering ways to use readings to get the most impactful writing from students while increasing their overall comprehension, says teacher Erin Corrigan-Smith.

Teaching Students Grammar in an Auto-Correct World

How can teachers convince students that learning grammar is worth the effort and can improve their writing? Jeremy Hyler and Troy Hicks suggest ways to implement a range of online tools to bring grammar alive for classes. Lots of ideas, writes Erin Corrigan-Smith.