Tagged: research

How Schools Can Create Enthusiastic Readers

What the Robbs have done so well is share their experiences as researchers and as educators and provide detailed procedures, anecdotes and insights to guide teachers as they help students become avid readers, writes teacher educator and middle grades veteran Linda Biondi.

Students Learn Better When They’re Moving

Effective teaching means engaging kids intellectually, socially AND physically. Educators who work strategically to include elements of kinesthetic activity will have students who are attentive, making connections, and able to recall later on. Curtis Chandler shows how.

Making Annotations with Less Pain, More Meaning

At its best, annotation starts a dialogue between our English and History students and thoughtful writers past and present. But that doesn’t mean adolescents are eager to do it. Sarah Cooper shares ideas and online resources to make the process a true learning experience.

How Many? A Counting Book for Everyone

Educators and parents alike will find How Many? A Counting Book a beautiful adventure in learning about how children can grapple with the complexities of mathematical reasoning in relatively simple terms using everyday objects, says history (?!) teacher Michael DiClemente.

Fostering Creativity and Innovation in Class

Jonathan Plucker’s book is for teachers and administrators who want to extend their understanding of creativity beyond the surface level and to rethink how their schools can better support their students as creative thinkers, writes teacher Claire Reddig.

The Top Skill We Can Teach Our Students

It’s at the precise moment when students are bombarded by facts, whether historical or current, that we need to be especially vigilant, writes American history and current events teacher Sarah Cooper, paraphrasing historian Sam Wineburg. Sifting through sources has become a life skill.