Tagged: student engagement

Battle Boredom with Student Engagement

In Gallup surveys, students report increasing levels of classroom boredom, topping out in high school. How do teachers counter the trend? Harris and Bradshaw offer strategies in their 2nd book on Battling Boredom. Rita Platt finds lots to use with her own students.

MiddleWeb’s Top 16 of 2016

During 2016, each of these featured MiddleWeb posts enjoyed at least 10,000 reads by middle grades educators. Some were visited by as many as 60,000. We’re sure you’ll find something useful here as you “learn forward” and prepare yourself for the new year.

On the Very First Day (Be the Best You Can Be)

It’s the first day of school and your middle level students are acting like, well, adolescents. You’ve got to hook them quick, says teacher Elyse Scott. Forget the pre-tests and paperwork. Jump in and let them know how exciting your classroom universe is going to be.

Humor in the Classroom

Where does humor fit into the classroom? Just about anywhere! Check out these refreshed resources on why humor works, how to share it, and where to find it. Funny math, ELA, social studies, and science resources abound.

Do We Really Have High Expectations for All?

When it comes to high expectations, learning consultant Barbara Blackburn says actions speak louder than beliefs. Using her own classroom mistakes as a backdrop, she points out the teacher behaviors that signal struggling learners whether we mean what we say.

Using Games to Teach Core Science Concepts

Faced with students struggling to learn complex science ideas in traditional ways, middle school teacher John Coveyou turned to classroom gaming as a solution. His colorful card games teach core concepts like ion-bonding, DNA principles and protein building.

Misconceptions about Mindset, Rigor, and Grit

Using Mindset, Rigor, and Grit as examples, veteran teacher Cheryl Mizerny weighs the potential value of trendy pedagogical ideas while pointing out how easily they can be misinterpreted or poorly implemented by educators, to the detriment of students.