15 Search results

For the term "Jason DeHart".

Teaching with a Wide Range of Digital Texts

In his fourth post in a series exploring ways that digital literacy impacts teaching and learning in the middle grades, Jason DeHart considers a wide range of digital texts (including music, visuals, film, video) and notes changing trends in engagement among his students.

Broaden Close Reading Beyond the Printed Page

Classrooms that teach a broad range of close reading skills are not only rich with texts but host a wide range of types of texts, from traditional to digital to hyperlinked to hybrid, writes ELA teacher Jason DeHart. Critical student thinking needs to occur in all these spaces.

Use Podcasting to Teach Fluency, Explore Genre

Middle schoolers encounter and process information in ever-changing ways, writes teacher Jason DeHart, who uses podcasting opportunities in his ELA classroom to teach fluency, explore genre, and engage with authors and authentic audiences. Learn about his six-step strategy.

Moving Past Old-School Definitions of Literacy

“I want to recognize that my students are, in fact, highly literate human beings whose understanding of literacy has been shaped by an age of screens and digital interactions,” writes ELA teacher Jason DeHart. The question becomes, how do we change to meet them where they are?

Pairing Graphic Novels with Their Text Originals

What might students learn about the “invisible process” of reading prose fiction by a comparative study of a novel and its graphic novel counterpart? Jason DeHart promises high interest and aha moments as readers see the story not only with their minds but with their eyes.

The Pathways to Literacy Are Entwined Around Us

ELA teacher Dr. Jason DeHart makes the argument that “literacy” today is not something that can only be accessed through an elusive set of text-based standards and practices but instead a state that can be achieved using a wide range of readily available media modalities.

Graphic Novels: Paired or Primary Reads?

Do graphic novels get to stand on their own, or should they be paired with additional texts? ELA teacher Jason DeHart explores that question and concludes (no surprise) that the answer is both. See his suggestions for paired titles that will appeal to middle grades readers.

Real or Imagined Lives: Teaching Moon Knight

While comics may not be an immediate go-to for all educators, they are a rich source of adolescent reader engagement. Teachers who are willing to linger with text and images to build conversations will discover their potential for literacy instruction, says Dr. Jason DeHart.

How Might We Teach a Graphic Novel Series?

In an earlier MiddleWeb post, professor and former middle grades ELA teacher Jason DeHart argued on behalf of teaching with graphic novels, with numerous examples. Here he delves deeper into a single text from the Kid Beowulf series, detailing his own instructional strategies.