Tagged: Ariel Sacks

2 Lessons Worth Sharing about Teacher Coaching

Done right, teacher coaching “can create bridges between varied experiences and classroom contexts, so that teaching knowledge flows in many directions, and teaching becomes a less isolated, more connected profession.” Ariel Sacks shares two lessons she learned early on.

Staying Student-Centered in Whole Novel Study

Ariel Sacks’ Whole Novels for the Whole Class is “the ultimate teacher-friendly manual for accommodating all students around a single book,” says ELA veteran Mary Tedrow, who finds Sacks’ practical specificity convincing and her confidence infectious.

Energizing Ideas for a Flexible ELA Classroom

Ariel Sacks says teachers who read The Flexible ELA Classroom will get to know “an enthusiastic, skilled teacher” effectively applying “many of the best current teaching trends.” Amber Chandler’s practical, student centered ideas include flexible differentiation, PBL infusion, family involvement and more.

A Celebration of Teachers

In a season filled with celebrations, MiddleWeb celebrates teachers by sharing some insights into the teaching life, offered by our bloggers and guest writers. We begin with the wonderful 2014 book, Teaching with Heart.

An Author & Her Readers Collaborate Online

When ELA teacher Ariel Sacks wrote a book tying the teaching of novels to student empowerment, her hopes for reader interaction were modest. Now she’s become part of a community of connected educators, digging deep into everyone’s ideas.

Teaching Whole Novels for Love and Standards

In Whole Novels for the Whole Class, Ariel Sacks offers a student-centered approach that promotes love of reading and deepens discussions, says reviewer Heather Wolpert-Gawron. Sacks’ documented strategies also address Common Core standards.

Let Them Read Whole Novels!

Ariel Sacks says that by teaching novels “whole” she has been able to ignite interest in books, deepen discussions & improve reading comprehension. In this informative article, Sacks shares her rationale, her method, and reactions from her middle school students.