Tagged: close reading

Beers/Probst: Fake News & Responsible Reading

In an era of fake news and “alternate facts” how do we teach kids to read responsibly? Respected literacy authors Kylene Beers and Robert Probst share three Big Questions that students can use to anchor themselves as they examine nonfiction and their own values.

How to Help Kids Be Active Video Viewers

Movies and video in the classroom can help boost media literacy and strengthen critical thinking, listening and viewing skills. The challenge is to get students to view moving images actively and critically. Here’s some help from author and media lit consultant Frank W. Baker.

Help Students Read & Think Like Scientists

To learn science deeply, students need the trifecta of instruction: experiments; exploration of a complex text; and teaching that’s both challenging and empowering. Deeper learning expert Libby Woodfin shares how this works in Peter Hill’s 8th grade classroom.

Use Political Covers to Teach Media Literacy

Paid ads and social media give lots of exposure to Presidential candidates. They also get free visibility from magazines, though they don’t always like what they see. Frank Baker offers a magazine-cover activity to help students build media literacy skills.

Close Reading for the Whole Class

Close Reading for the Whole Class is easy to follow and designed for “real life classrooms.” Research based and with practical lesson plans, the book takes the angst out of close reading. Great for individual or group study, says reviewer Linda Biondi.

☆ Teacher Favorites: 20 MiddleWeb ELA Articles

Each of these 20 English Language Arts-oriented articles (dating back to 2012) has enjoyed thousands of reads since it was first published at MiddleWeb. From closer reading to better writing, we hope you find some helpful ideas and inspiration for the new school year!

Closer Reading Units For (or By) You

In Lessons and Units for Closer Reading, Nancy Boyles dives into curriculum design, explaining the creation of units starting with a theme, an author, a genre, and more. Reviewer Jennifer Wirtz appreciates the book’s usefulness to middle grades teachers.