Tagged: Michael DiClemente

How Many? A Counting Book for Everyone

Educators and parents alike will find How Many? A Counting Book a beautiful adventure in learning about how children can grapple with the complexities of mathematical reasoning in relatively simple terms using everyday objects, says history (?!) teacher Michael DiClemente.

Beyond the Tyranny of History Textbooks

In a new edition of Teaching What Really Happened, Loewen moves beyond textbook distortions of historical facts and calls for teaching unvarnished history to educate “critical citizens.” History educator Michael DiClemente highlights insights all K-12 teachers can use.

Understanding & Using Reading Assessment

The wonderful thing about teaching is there’s always more to learn. History teacher Michael DiClemente has been looking into reading (which his students do lots of). Peter Afflerbach’s Understanding and Using Reading Assessment has him rethinking his classroom practice.

Two Books to Support New Teacher Mentoring

Carol Pelletier Radford’s 2017 books can help beginning teachers by giving their mentors detailed guidelines, a clearly defined schedule, and routines that allow flexibility for both mentor and mentee, says school district new-teacher liaison Michael DiClemente.

Willingham: Ideas to Raise Kids Who Read

Both parents and teachers can benefit from reading Daniel Willingham’s thorough exploration of the science of reading and comprehension, gaining insights into what works with different age groups, says middle school educator Michael DiClemente.

Why We Need to Rethink Grading Practices

After reviewing the history of grading, Cathy Vatterott shares reasons for implementing a progressive standards-based grading system, noting the challenges as well as the benefits. Teacher Michael DiClemente sees the need for research-based changes but wonders how to get there.

Inquiry-Based Lessons in U.S. History

Teachers looking for new ways to incorporate primary sources into history lessons covering 5 centuries will find great ideas in Jana Kirchner and Andrew McMichael’s Inquiry-Based Lessons in U.S. History, says social studies teacher Michael DiClemente.