Tagged: middle school

5 Tips to Engage Kids in Inquiry This Fall

Kathryn Caprino and Sean Ruday encourage you to include inquiry in your teaching this fall, whether it’s face to face, in remote settings, or a blend. The literacy educators share 5 tips with cross-curricular application to engage kids in the pursuit of essential questions.

Anchoring Readers in the Tides of Change

As teachers and students are tossed by the currents of Covid-19, Katie Durkin plans to anchor and then expand her 7th graders’ views of themselves as readers by puzzling out a reading identity, reflecting and planning for the horizon, and charting a path forward.

Hands-On Physical Science in Middle School

Hands-On Physical Science challenges 6th-8th graders to develop ways to solve tasks and answer questions using a hands-on, inquiry-based approach, taking abstract physics and chemistry concepts and make them more concrete and real-world, writes teacher Tracy Albers.

Picture Books Help with Standards and Mastery

Jennifer Sniadecki and Jason DeHart dive deep into using picture books in upper level classrooms to meet state standards and increase student mastery. In this 3rd post on the topic they share examples, research, and stories from their own teaching experiences.

Picture Books Set the Stage for Middle School Learning

In Part 2 of a series on using picture books in middle school, Jennifer Sniadecki and Jason DeHart focus on “the simple power” of stories with minimal text to set the stage for lessons, provide background knowledge, and make efficient use of daily class time. Example: Eva Bunting’s Terrible Things.

Picture Books: Perfect for Middle Schoolers

Students at ages 9-13 still want to hear their teachers read aloud, want to sit on the rug, want to engage in stories. Jennifer Sniadecki and Jason DeHart share evidence that picture books are also an effective way to teach figurative language and other ELA standards.

The Virtues of Teaching Middle School Online

Middle schools and their students are special. By design 6-8 grade schools are intended to be communities, organized in houses or teams as the kids are exploring themselves and their world. All this helps in the leap to online school, says teacher Laurie Lichtenstein.