209 Search results

For the term "White".

How to Teach Reading in the Middle Grades

By using a menu of formative assessments to target and support students’ specific reading needs, you can differentiate instruction and positively impact their progress at key points in their development. Expert Laura Robb offers a master class in reading support for middle graders.

Opening the Doors to Girls’ STEM Success

We have a severe shortage of tech workers that’s growing geometrically. Today, women make up just 27% of people in STEM careers. How do we finally get girls fully engaged in STEM? Anne Jolly shares a series of questions and tips that can guide STEM teachers and school leaders.

4 Reasons for Optimism About Public Education

Williamson and Blackburn highlight four good reasons to be optimistic about the future of America’s public schools. Community approval is the highest in nearly 50 years; teachers are better prepared for the future, and the resilience of public educators remains remarkable.

How Blank Walls Built Community in 7th Grade

How-to articles often tout the idea of starting the school year with blank walls. 7th grade team leader Katie Durkin decided to finally let go of her need to fully decorate things herself and invite students and teachers to fill the empty spaces with community-building visuals.

We Don’t Need CRT to Say That Race Matters

In Jay Wamsted’s 8th grade math class he chooses to go right for the conversation on race and culture when the opportunity arises. “After all, why not try to know each other a little better?” Learning happens, he says, when students and teacher can be authentic with each other.

The Long & Winding Road to Women’s Rights

Women’s history is no longer in hiding, thanks to scholars who are documenting women’s impact on society. Middle grades teachers can help their students trace that history with these resources, just updated and expanded, for Women’s History Month and beyond.

Black History Month All Year Long

African Americans faced severe repression when Carter G. Woodson established Negro History Week in 1926. In this updated MiddleWeb resource, we share links that trace the impact of African Americans in politics, arts and sciences, and report on the call to teach Black history throughout the school year.

What Works Better than Punishment in School

We all know “that” student who arrives late, avoids homework, ignores class. School psychologist Katelyn Oellerich shares why rote punishment doesn’t solve the problem or help students learn. Instead, she recommends, apply logical consequences that students will understand.

Educating for Equity in the Wake of Injustice

Alyssa Hadley Dunn’s Teaching on Days After offers research and narratives on how teachers can respond equitably on days after cataclysmic events so that they and their students “reach the full measure of their humanity.” Sarah Cooper recommends Dunn’s pedagogical strategies.