Category: Articles

Use 6 Leadership Pillars to Empower Teachers

Middle school principal Evan Robb’s Six Pillars of Leadership work in concert to form a solid and lasting foundation for shared decision making. The result: a student-centered culture that values collective vision, empowerment, risk-taking, kindness, trust, equity and more.

Variety and Spice: Our Top 10 Posts of 2019

We asked Google Analytics to find the 10 most-read posts published at MiddleWeb during 2019. We love the variety and the solid advice. Every contributor has been a successful classroom teacher who loves to collaborate with colleagues. Here they are, in no particular order.

4 Online Ideas for Civics and Current Events

For social studies teachers, incorporating civics and current events is an important part of the job, says teacher and civics blogger Brian Rock. “Your task is, ultimately, to help grow and develop the next generation of citizens.” He suggests four helpful online resources.

Renew Your Classroom Community in January

Taking time to refresh your classroom space, renew positive relationships and reinforce routines you established in the fall is time well-spent the first week back in January. Consultant Stacey Shubitz also recommends getting a head start on 2020 with some December prep.

Five-Step, Never-Fail Character Sketching

Why is NBCT Marilyn Pryle’s “never-fail” Character Sketch activity so effective? Because it asks students to use the people in their own lives as inspiration – a parent, grandparent, sibling, or friend. Pryle provides the teacher’s script, complete with student prompts.

Storytelling – The Heart of Teaching and Learning

Storytelling – speaking, writing, hearing, and appreciating our own and other’s stories – can be an equalizer for ensuring all students’ lives are respected, honored, and recorded, writes Literacy Essentials author Regie Routman. Learn about her new podcast series.

3 Ways We Can Offer Students More Choice

Having the ability to choose our own focus makes people, on average, five times more committed to the outcome. The classroom implications are clear, says teaching consultant Barbara Blackburn. “If students are more invested in their work, they are more likely to learn.”