Tagged: argument

Texts and Lessons for Content Area Writing

Content area teachers can access easy-to-use lessons and mentor texts to strengthen students’ writing in Nancy Steineke and Harvey “Smokey” Daniels’ resource book. Teacher Linda Biondi describes the detailed, teacher-friendly format for lessons lasting 10 to 40 minutes.

Do We Really Know How to Teach Argument?

Many teachers are not well equipped to teach “argument” and prepare students for assessments that require them to build an effective claim. Author and consultant Erik Palmer deconstructs current efforts to teach persuasive writing and offers better solutions.

Media Literacy: Learning about Product Placement

As product placement ads invade more of our visual space, educators can use the trend as a hook to engage students in critical thinking about what it means to be media literate. Expert Frank Baker uses the NBA’s 2016-17 plans for jersey advertising as an example.

Tools to Help Writers Explain Good Evidence

Literacy expert Sarah Tantillo shares teacher Jamison Fort’s engaging multi-day lesson that helps student writers sort through multiple claims in the case of Sandra the Orangutan and identify the best evidence to support arguments. Graphic organizer included!

Help Student Writers Find the Best Evidence

Teaching students to write effective arguments supported by reliable evidence is one of the notable “stretch goals” of the common core. Expert Sarah Tantillo has added a critical new step to her own strategy in an effort to help more students reach the goal.

Develop Thinking and Writing with Argument

In “Argue with Me” Deanna Kuhn et al present a full curriculum on teaching argument, informed by their research in low income schools. Used in full or in part, the process can benefit thinking & writing skills, says Mary Langer Thompson.

Why Argument Writing Is Important to Teach

Knowing how to respond to counterclaims while developing their own claims in argumentative writing helps students in school and beyond. Educators Leslie Skantz-Hodgson and Jamilla Jones report on their summer studying “They Say/I Say” with teacher colleagues.