Tagged: grammar

Grammar Instruction the Safe and Social Way

“Let’s face it, adolescence isn’t plump full of safety and confidence. It’s a developmental stage in which students want and need to be connected and valued.” No wonder middle schoolers dread the “correction” approach to grammar. Jeff Anderson and Travis Leech have found a better way.

Mentor Texts Can Help Kids Grasp Grammar

In The Elementary School Grammar Toolkit Sean Ruday shows how to use mentor texts as a tool to help kids connect with engaging material as they learn proper writing conventions. Teacher Kathie Palmieri says the book will enrich writing in the intermediate grades and beyond.

Lessons for Teaching Grammar in Context

In More Grammar to Get Things Done, authors Crovitz and Devereaux strike the right balance of ideological and practical to make the idea of a pedagogical shift to teaching grammar in context not only doable but exciting, says ELA teacher Karen Rubado.

Rethinking How We Teach Sentence-Building

In Between the Commas 6th grade teacher Jeny Randall is delighted to have found a new mentor in writing instruction who emphasizes a sentence construction framework. She looks forward to growing even more as a writing teacher thanks to Martin Brandt’s “irreverent wisdom.”

Blending Grammar into Daily ELA Instruction

One of the most common concerns Sarah Tantillo hears from ELA teachers is “I want to teach grammar, but I’m not sure how to fit it in.” Her new MiddleWeb post explains a systematic approach that blends grammar into narrative reading and writing classes, day by day.

Think “Makerspace!” for Your Grammar Studies

When we plunge into interactive learning, we get curious, look closely, ask questions, hypothesize, jot, mimic, create, play, discover, and draw conclusions. Grammar study with a makerspace mindset can build all these things in, says literacy consultant Patty McGee.

Using Grammar to Improve K-12 Writing

Sarah Tantillo uses an inferential approach, in which students analyze how the grammar works. She follows the Common Core standards to structure the book. ELA teacher Amanda Berry appreciates Tantillo’s insights and humor but concludes the self-published book needed an editor.

We Can Teach Grammar Better Than This

Grammar doesn’t need to be numbing. As you consider curriculum additions and tweaks over summer, author and literacy consultant Sarah Tantillo suggests ways you can incorporate grammar into those refreshed lessons to help students understand structure and write more clearly.