Tagged: marilyn pryle

This Strategy Promotes Real Reading Discussions

Using the Reading Response strategy, Marilyn Pryle writes, class time becomes a time of meaningful discovery. Students do not passively ingest information but actively create ideas through their own thinking, writing and discussion. Teachers facilitate, clarify and celebrate.

50 Dynamic Writing Activities for All Kids

Marilyn Pryle’s 50 Writing Activities for Meeting Higher Standards provides educators across content areas with opportunities to teach writing in a logical, fun, and research-based way. The fully developed lessons take Writers Workshop to the next level, says Linda Biondi.

Three Fun Activities to Keep Students Writing

Writers get better by writing, says author and ELA teacher Marilyn Pryle. “It’s our job to have students write regularly, genuinely, and with ownership.” She shares three fun writing tasks (including directions, a model and a prewrite activity) that get the job done!

10 Cool Ways to Teach with Word Clouds

Wordles are everywhere, in every color and size. Middle grades teacher and Scholastic author Marilyn Pryle shows 10 ways word clouds made with Wordle and Tagxedo can be crafted into powerful literacy teaching tools, using the right prompts and directions.

5 Reader Activities That Invite Higher Thinking

You’ve taught students to read closely, to annotate, to discuss – now what? Teacher/writer Marilyn Pryle shares five reader-response activities she uses to help students interact with texts in creative ways, inviting higher levels of thinking & understanding.

50 Easy-to-Implement Reading Response Ideas

Easy to implement suggestions and detailed reading response lessons make educator Marilyn Pryle’s recent book a helpful addition to the Common Core ELA bookshelf. Reviewer Sandy Wisneski recommends its common-sense resources for modeling, assessing, and practice.

Managing Multiple Writing Conferences

In Part 2 of her article on conferencing with student writers, teacher-author Marilyn Pryle tells how she manages multiple conferences with each student during a class period. The key: give students small manageable tasks they can do on their own.

Writing Conferences: Praise & Focus Critical

In the first of two articles about conferencing with middle grades writers, teacher-author Marilyn Pryle identifies a pair of critical elements that need to be present in early conversations: (1) praise; and (2) a focus on meaning – not grammar.