Tagged: Prufrock Press

Genius Hour Can Ignite Innovation and Inquiry

Andi McNair’s Genius Hour (2nd Ed) guides educators across grade levels and content areas in developing student Passion Projects start to finish. Reviewer Stephanie Choate gives high marks to the book’s 6-point strategy: passion, plan, pitch, project, product, and presentation.

SEL Reading & Reflection for Gifted Students

Author Thomas Hébert recommends K-12 books he believes can help gifted students develop SEL skills. Vignettes from six classrooms demonstrate ways to use text selections effectively. Reviewer Amy Estersohn found the book’s appendix of 160+ suggested texts most valuable.

Strength-Based Goal Setting for Gifted Kids

Phelps and Lewis offer a comprehensive guide to setting goals, delineating a process that is sure to be impactful for gifted learners. Specialists working with 2E or underachieving students will appreciate the strengths-first framing, writes gifted education leader Kim Rensch.

ThinkLaw Strategies Can Grow Critical Thinkers

Find out how adopting a lawyer mindset can help all students develop critical thinking skills and dispositions in Thinking Like a Lawyer by Colin Seale. NBCT Kim Rensch likes that the book is a quick read and offers reasonable ways to integrate thinking skills with curricula.

Differentiating History Instruction with Menus

Laurie E. Westphal offers a comprehensive introduction to student choice and how to make menus successful. Aimed at high school, the ideas can also work for advanced students in middle school as they develop their strengths, writes history teacher Erin Corrigan-Smith.

Math Curriculum for Gifted Sixth Graders

Math Curriculum for Gifted Students (Grade 6): Lessons, Activities and Extensions is a great resource for pull-out math and afterschool enrichment, differentiation in the regular or gifted classroom, and more, writes middle grades Exceptional Student educator Laura Von Staden.

Using Menus to Differentiate Literature

Differentiating Instruction with Menus: Literature (3-5) provides a variety of excellent activities to involve students in thoughtful and purposeful engagement with and response to texts. Some teachers may wish to substitute more diverse texts, writes Sarah Pennington.