Tagged: Stenhouse

A Refreshing Approach to Teaching Poetry

Shirley McPhillips’ non-traditional book about teaching poetry is both insightful and fun to read, says retired principal and former California senior poet laureate Mary Langer Thompson. She predicts teachers will not be able to read for long without writing poetry themselves.

Why Talk About Mistakes in Math Class?

Why talk about mistakes in math class? Nancy C. Anderson has the answer in her book “What’s Right About Wrong Answers.” Resource teacher Kimberly Mueller says Anderson’s activities can help students learn how to analyze their mistakes and develop a growth mindset.

Ways to Become a More Authentic Writing Teacher

In Renew! Become a Better—and More Authentic—Writing Teacher, Shawna Coppola challenges us to reconsider three long-standing traditions of classroom writing instruction: a step-by-step writing process, graphic organizers, and the prioritization of words over images.

Higher Order Thinking with Geometric Shapes

Each student Amy Estersohn shared the book “Which One Doesn’t Belong” with spent time lost deep in thought among the geometric images and was able to articulate a reasonable explanation for why a shape didn’t belong. The teacher’s guide can help build math discussion.

Teaching History with Place-Based Learning

Drawing on his research experiences in the Journey through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area, nationally recognized educator James A. Percoco leads history teachers through the techniques of place-based learning to bring the American story alive for students.

Be the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had

Pre-service teacher Emmy Avery Witham didn’t look forward to teaching math. But reading the ‘real-world’ strategies in Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had by Tracy Johnston Zager has boosted her confidence that she can help students succeed in math class.

Learning Life Science with Picture Books

Bring exploration, fact-gathering and deduction to grades 3-5 life science classes with Stewart and Chesley’s “Perfect Pairs.” Full of standards-based lessons aligned to fiction/nonfiction picture books. Literacy coach Pam Hamilton eager to share it with teachers.

Teaching Science with Engaging Picture Books

“Perfect Pairs” uses fiction and nonfiction life science books to promote inquiry learning in grades 3-5. The 20 richly detailed, standards-aligned lessons can help any teacher engage students in exploration, fact-gathering and deduction, says 4th grade veteran Linda Biondi.

Writer’s Workshop with Latino Mentor Texts

“Equal parts how-to and shopping list,” teacher Any Estersohn says Ruth Culham’s Dream Wakers will help any middle grades ELA or social studies teacher add more Latino voices and mentor texts – especially in classrooms with a writer’s workshop teaching approach.