Tagged: Heinemann

Using 100-Word Stories for Expansive Writing

100-Word Stories: A Short Form for Expansive Writing by Kim Culbertson and Grant Faulkner is a wonderful resource for teaching with micro texts and for helping students in levels 5-12 develop both writing and reading mastery, writes middle school ELA teacher Erin Corrigan-Smith.

The Democratic Roots Essential to Literacy

In Literacy’s Democratic Roots: A Personal Tour Through 8 Big Ideas, Thomas Newkirk brings his enormous experience and wisdom from writing and teaching over many decades to his exploration of the connections between literacy education and democracy, writes Laurie Miller Hornik.

The Reading Strategies Book Gets an Update

The Reading Strategies Book 2.0 takes a great first edition and makes it even better, says literacy coach Pam Hamilton, noting Jennifer Serravallo’s contention that reading strategies are important across K-12. “This book should be in the hands of every teacher of reading.”

An Enhanced Edition of ‘When Kids Can’t Read’

Literacy coach Pam Hamilton finds lots to like in Kylene Beers’ latest version of When Kids Can’t Read – What Teachers Can Do. The second edition keeps some of her favorite features from the original and adds many new kid-tested ideas to help teachers reach all their students.

How Fiction Writing Can Transform Students

Thomas Newkirk urges ELA educators to move beyond simply assigning formulaic writing grounded in rubrics and include more fiction writing. Using research as well as student and teacher voices, he shows the benefits of encouraging creativity. A call to action, says Katie Durkin.

A Poetry Resource Sure to Engage Students

Linda Rief’s Whispering in the Wind shows how poetry helps us listen to the voices of others and allows us to share our voices. She offers practical advice, concrete examples, and specific resources to expand the teaching of poetry by creating “Heart Books,” writes ELA teacher Kasey Short.

Texturing Culturally Sustaining Practices

Lorena Germán easily weaves her personal experiences into the presentation of her Textured Teaching framework, holding our interest as she invites us into a deeper reflection about what it means to grow a culturally sustaining teaching practice and how we can bring that about.

The Power We Gain by Teaching Vulnerably

In The Power of Teaching Vulnerably David Rockower explains how personal, relational, and dialogic vulnerability can help educators build healthy classroom dialogue. Amy Estersohn would have liked more guidance for teachers facing job loss if they discuss sensitive topics.