Category: Book Reviews

Higher Order Thinking with Geometric Shapes

Each student Amy Estersohn shared the book “Which One Doesn’t Belong” with spent time lost deep in thought among the geometric images and was able to articulate a reasonable explanation for why a shape didn’t belong. The teacher’s guide can help build math discussion.

Creating a Classroom Culture of Feedback

William Ferriter and Paul Cancellieri pack their book on rethinking student feedback with knowledge and helpful advice that can benefit teachers and empower students as learners, says educator Bill Ivey. He shares possible applications for his own classroom.

Fiction and Nonfiction: Smart Lesson Planning

Do you want a book filled with lesson plans that you can use the next day or something based in theory that will inform your teaching decisions along the way? Pam Hamilton writes you can have it both ways in these fiction and nonfiction guides by Gravity Goldberg and Renee Houser.

How to Maximize School Board Effectiveness

This is a needed, practical book for superintendents, school leaders, and others who want to know how districts work and how these key figures should function in terms of school governance and working relationships, says retired principal Mary Langer Thompson.

Strategies to Energize School Staff and Culture

School Culture Recharged is a good mix of philosophy, research, and practical strategy. Rita Platt recommends that “school and district leaders read it to get a handle on the what’s, how’s, and why’s of developing school cultures that help bring about success for all.”

Teach Workshop Writing with K-6 Mentor Texts

In the 2nd edition of Mentor Texts, Lynne Dorfman and Rose Cappelli help put a gradual-release focus on purposeful planning, finding stories to engage young readers, and using the book’s readings to support strong writing by students, says Erin Corrigan-Smith.

Teaching History with Place-Based Learning

Drawing on his research experiences in the Journey through Hallowed Ground National Heritage Area, nationally recognized educator James A. Percoco leads history teachers through the techniques of place-based learning to bring the American story alive for students.