Tagged: math

Higher Order Thinking with Geometric Shapes

Each student Amy Estersohn shared the book “Which One Doesn’t Belong” with spent time lost deep in thought among the geometric images and was able to articulate a reasonable explanation for why a shape didn’t belong. The teacher’s guide can help build math discussion.

Stick to Routines to Promote Math Reasoning

In Routines for Reasoning, authors Kelemanick, Lucenta and Creighton make the case for establishing and sticking to routines to foster mathematical practices for all students. Educator Rita Platt finds she is “a better teacher and thinker for having read it.”

Deepen Math Thinking with Percussive Dance

Malke Rosenfeld’s Math on the Move is about changing student mindsets about mathematics through whole body movement. Linda Biondi finds it packed with K-8 classroom tested activities, coaching tips, video clips and more to have students “dancing in the aisles”!

Math Projects Need Deeper Math Lessons

State math consultant Sara Schafer is often asked for rich math projects at the elementary school level. While some of the projects in 10 Performance-Based Projects show promise, the lack of mathematically robust content in the grades 3-5 book disappoints her.

Be the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had

Pre-service teacher Emmy Avery Witham didn’t look forward to teaching math. But reading the ‘real-world’ strategies in Becoming the Math Teacher You Wish You’d Had by Tracy Johnston Zager has boosted her confidence that she can help students succeed in math class.

Problem-based Science for the Common Good

Problem-based Science encourages students to develop a love of scientific thinking, math, and the creative use of technology as they learn through invention, design thinking, fixing and tinkering. Teacher-author Christa Flores demonstrates her hands-on PbS model.

Making Sure Students Master Math Facts

Math Running Records in Action by Dr. Nicki Newton is an easy-to-read book that offers a helpful framework for assessing, teaching and practicing math facts. Reviewer Rita Platt says “this book was a revelation to me” for its focus on how students think about math.